5th Grade Curriculum

 

Math

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Write and interpret numerical expressions.

  • [5. OA.1] Use parentheses, brackets, or braces in numerical expressions, and evaluate expressions with these symbols.
  • [5. OA.2] Write simple expressions that record calculations with numbers, and interpret numerical expressions without evaluating:
    • Express the calculation “add 8 and 7, then multiply by 2” as 2 × (8 + 7)
    • Recognize that 3 × (18932 + 921) is three times as large as 18932 + 921, without having to calculate the indicated sum or product.

Analyze patterns and relationships.

  • [5. OA.3] Generate two numerical patterns using two given rules. Identify apparent relationships between corresponding terms. Form ordered pairs consisting of corresponding terms from the two patterns, and graph the ordered pairs on a coordinate plane.
    • For example, given the rule “Add 3” and the starting number 0, and given the rule “Add 6” and the starting number 0, generate terms in the resulting sequences, and observe that the terms in one sequence are twice the corresponding terms in the other sequence. Explain informally why this is so.

Numbers and Operations in Base Ten

Understand the place value system.

  • [5. NBT.1] Recognize that in a multi-digit number, a digit in one place represents 10 times as much as it represents in the place to its right and 1/10 of what it represents in the place to its left.
  • [5. NBT.2] Explain patterns in the number of zeros of the product when multiplying a number by powers of 10, and explain patterns in the placement of the decimal point when a decimal is multiplied or divided by a power of 10. Use whole-number  exponents to denote powers of 10.
  • [5. NBT.3] Read, write, and compare decimals to thousandths.
    • Read and write decimals to thousandths using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form.
      • a. e.g., 347.392 = 3 × 100 + 4 × 10 + 7 × 1 + 3 × (1/10) + 9 × (1/100) + 2 × (1/1000)
      • b. Compare two decimals to thousandths based on meanings of the digits in each place, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.
  • [5. NBT.4] Use place value understanding to round decimals to any place.

Perform operations with multi-digit whole numbers and with decimals to hundredths.

  • [5. NBT.5] Fluently multiply multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm.
  • [5. NBT.6] Find whole-number quotients of whole numbers with up to four-digit dividends and two-digit divisors, using strategies based on place value, the properties of operations, and/or the relationship between multiplication and division. Illustrate and explain the calculation by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models.
  • [5. NBT.7] Add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals to hundredths, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used.

Numbers and Operations - Fractions

Use equivalent fractions as a strategy to add and subtract fractions.

  • [5. NF.1] Add and subtract fractions with unlike denominators (including mixed numbers) by replacing given fractions with  equivalent fractions in such a way as to produce an equivalent sum or difference of fractions with like denominators.
    • For example, 2/3 + 5/4 = 8/12 + 15/12 = 23/12. (In general, a/b + c/d = (ad + bc)/bd.)
  • [5. NF.2] Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions referring to the same whole, including cases of unlike denominators, e.g., by using visual fraction models or equations to represent the problem. Use benchmark fractions and number sense of fractions to estimate mentally and assess the reasonableness of answers.
    • For example, recognize an incorrect result 2/5 + 1/2 = 3/7, by observing that 3/7 < 1/2.

Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division to multiply and divide fractions.

  • [5. NF.3] Interpret a fraction as division of the numerator by the denominator (a/b = a ÷ b). Solve word problems involving division of whole numbers leading to answers in the form of fractions or mixed numbers, e.g., by using visual fraction models or equations to represent the problem.
    • For example, interpret 3/4 as the result of dividing 3 by 4,noting that 3/4 multiplied by 4 equals 3, and that when 3 wholes are shared equally among 4 people each person has a share of size 3/4. If 9 people want to share a 50-pound sack of rice equally by weight, how many pounds of rice should each person get? Between what two whole numbers does your answer lie?.
  • [5. NF.4] Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication to multiply a fraction or whole number by a fraction.
    • a. Interpret the product (a/b) × q as a parts of a partition of q into b equal parts; equivalently, as the result of a sequence of operations a × q ÷ b. For example, use a visual fraction model to show (2/3) × 4 = 8/3, and create a story context for this equation. Do the same with (2/3) × (4/5) = 8/15. (In general, (a/b) × (c/d) = ac/bd.)
    • b. Find the area of a rectangle with fractional side lengths by tiling it with unit squares of the appropriate unit fraction side lengths, and show that the area is the same as would be found by multiplying the side lengths. Multiply fractional side lengths to find areas of rectangles, and represent fraction products as rectangular areas.
  • [5. NF.5] Interpret multiplication as scaling (resizing), by:
    • a. Comparing the size of a product to the size of one factor on the basis of the size of the other factor, without performing the indicated multiplication
    • b. Explaining why multiplying a given number by a fraction greater than 1 results in a product greater than the given number (recognizing multiplication by whole numbers greater than 1 as a familiar case); explaining why multiplying a given number by a fraction less than 1 results in a product smaller than the given number; and relating the principle of fraction equivalence a/b = (n×a)/(n×b) to the effect of multiplying a/b by 1.
  • [5. NF.6] Solve real world problems involving multiplication of fractions and mixed numbers, e.g., by using visual fraction models or equations to represent the problem.
  • [5. NF.7] Apply and extend previous understandings of division to divide unit fractions by whole numbers and whole numbers by unit fractions. (Note: Students able to multiply fractions in general can develop strategies to divide fractions in general, by reasoning about the relationship between multiplication and division. But division of a fraction by a fraction is not a requirement at this grade.)
    • a. Interpret division of a unit fraction by a non-zero whole number, and compute such quotients. For example, create a story context for (1/3) ÷ 4, and use a visual fraction model to show the quotient. Use the relationship between multiplication and division to explain that (1/3) ÷ 4 = 1/12 because (1/12) × 4 = 1/3.
    • b. Interpret division of a whole number by a unit fraction, and compute such quotients. For example, create a story context for 4 ÷ (1/5), and use a visual fraction model to show the quotient. Use the relationship between multiplication and division to explain that 4 ÷ (1/5) = 20 because 20 × (1/5) = 4.
    • c. Solve real world problems involving division of unit fractions by non-zero whole numbers and division of whole numbers by unit fractions, e.g., by using visual fraction models and equations to represent the problem. For example, how much chocolate will each person get if 3 people share 1/2 lb of chocolate equally? How many 1/3-cup servings are in 2 cups of raisins?

Measurement and Data

Convert like measurement units within a given measurement system.

  • [5. MD.1] Convert among different-sized standard measurement units within a given measurement system (e.g., convert 5 cm to 0.05 m), and use these conversions in solving multi-step, real world problems.

Represent and interpret data.

  • [5. MD.2] Make a line plot to display a data set of measurements in fractions of a unit (1/2, 1/4, 1/8). Use operations on fractions for this grade to solve problems involving information presented in line plots. For example, given different measurements of liquid in identical beakers, find the amount of liquid each beaker would contain if the total amount in all the beakers were redistributed equally.

Geometric measurement: understand concepts of volume and relate volume to multiplication and to addition.

  • [5. MD.3] Recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understand concepts of volume measurement.
    • a. A cube with side length 1 unit, called a "unit cube" is said to have "one cubic unit" of volume, and can be used to measure volume.
    • b. A solid figure which can be packed without gaps or overlaps using n unit cubes is said to have a volume of n cubic units.
  • [5. MD.4] Measure volumes by counting unit cubes, using cubic cm, cubic in, cubic ft, and improvised units.
  • [5. MD.5] Relate volume to the operations of multiplication and addition and solve real world and mathematical problems involving volume.
    • a. Find the volume of a right rectangular prism with whole-number side lengths by packing it with unit cubes, and show that the volume is the same as would be found by multiplying the edge lengths, equivalently by multiplying the height by the area of the base. Represent threefold wholenumber products as volumes, e.g., to represent the associative property of multiplication.
    • b. Apply the formulas V = l × w × h and V = b × h for rectangular prisms to find volumes of right rectangular prisms with whole-number edge lengths in the context of solving real world and mathematical problems.
    • c. Recognize volume as additive. Find volumes of solid figures composed of two nonoverlapping right rectangular prisms by adding the volumes.

Geometry

Graph points on the coordinate plane to solve real-world and mathematical problems.

  • [5. G.1] Use a pair of perpendicular number lines, called axes, to define a coordinate system, with the intersection of the lines (the origin) arranged to coincide with the 0 on each line and a given point in the plane located by using an ordered pair of numbers, called its coordinates. Understand that the first number indicates how far to travel from the origin in the direction of one axis, and the second number indicates how far to travel in the direction of the second axis, with the convention that the names of the two axes and the coordinates correspond (e.g., x-axis and x-coordinate, y-axis and y-coordinate).
  • [5. G.2] Represent real world and mathematical problems by graphing points in the first quadrant of the coordinate plane, and interpret coordinate values of points in the context of the situation. Classify two-dimensional figures into categories based on their properties.
  • [5. G.3] Understand that attributes belonging to a category of two-dimensional figures also belong to all subcategories of that category. For example, all rectangles have four right angles and squares are rectangles, so all squares have four right angles.
  • [5. G.4] Classify two-dimensional figures in a hierarchy based on properties.

Reading

**Note: A standard highlighted red indicates a focus standard and a standard highlighted green indicates a previously taught standard.

Reading Standards 1st Quarter

  • [RL5.1] Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • [RL5.2] Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarizes the text.
  • [RL5.4] Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.
  • [RL5.7] Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text (e.g., graphic novel, multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale, myth, poem).
  • [RF5.3a] Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis in decoding words. Use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar multi-syllabic words in context and out of context.
  • [RF5.4a] Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding.
  • [RL5.3] Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact).
  • [RF5.3a] Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis in decoding words. Use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar multi-syllabic words in context and out of context.
  • [RF5.4b] Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. Read on-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.
  • [L5.4b] Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 5 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek and Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., photograph, photosynthesis).
  • [L5.5c] Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.  Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., synonyms, antonyms, homographs) to better understand each of the words.

The standards below may be observed and assessed within any content area throughout the day:

  • [SL5.1] Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
    • Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material, explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.
    • Follow agreed upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles.
    • Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others.
  • [SL5.6] Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate conversational, general academic, and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that signal contrast, addition, and other logical relationships (e.g., however, although, nevertheless, similarly, moreover, in addition).

Reading Standards 2nd Quarter

  • [RI5.1] Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • [RI5.3] Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.
  • [RI5.5] Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts.
  • [RI5.7] Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.
  • [RI5.8] Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point(s).
  • [RF5.3a] Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis in decoding words. Use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar multi-syllabic words in context and out of context.
  • [RF5.4c] Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.
  • [RI5.2] Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.
  • [RI5.4] Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 5 topic or subject area.
  • [RI5.6] Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.
  • [RI5.9] Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.
  • [L5.6] Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate conversational, general academic, and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that signal contrast, addition, and other logical relationships (e.g., however, although, nevertheless, similarly, moreover, in addition).

The standards below may be observed and assessed within any content area throughout the day:

  • [SL5.1] Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
    • c. Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others.
    • d. Review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of information and knowledge gained and discussed.
  • [SL5.4] Report on a topic or text, or present an opinion, sequencing ideas logically and using appropriate facts and relevant descriptive details to support main ideas or theme, speak clearly at an understandable pace.
  • [SL5.5] Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, sound) and visual displays in presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.
  • [L5.4] Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 5 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
    • a. Use context (e.g., cause/effect relationships and comparisons in text) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
    • c. Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation and determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases

Reading Standards 3rd Quarter

  • [RL5.2] Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarizes the text.
  • [RL5.4] Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.
  • [RL5.5] Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem.
  • [RL5.7] Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text (e.g., graphic novel, multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale, myth, poem).
  • [RL5.9] Compare and contrast stories in the same genre (e.g., mysteries and adventure stories) on their approaches to similar themes and topics.
  • [RF5.3a] Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis in decoding words. Use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar multi-syllabic words in context and out of context.
  • [RF5.4b] Read on-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.
  • [RF5.4c] Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.
  • [L5.5] Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
    • a. Interpret figurative language, including similes and metaphors, in context.
    • c. Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., synonyms, antonyms, homographs) to better understand each of the words.
  • [RL5.2] Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarizes the text.
  • [RL5.6] Describe how a narrator’s or speaker’s point of view influences how events are described.

The standards below may be observed and assessed within any content area throughout the day:

  • [SL5.1c] Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.  Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others.
  • [SL5.1d] ???
  • [SL5.2] Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
  • [L5.3b] Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. Compare and contrast the varieties of English (e.g., dialects, registers) used in stories, dramas, or poems.
  • [L5.4] Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 5 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
    • a. Use context (e.g., cause/effect relationships and comparisons in text) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
    • b. Use common, grad-appropriate Greek and Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., photograph, photosynthesis).
    • c. Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation and determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases.

Reading Standards 4th Quarter

  • [RI5.6] Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.
  • [RL5.10] By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, drama and poetry, in the grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
  • [RI5.10] By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
  • [RF5.4c] Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.
  • [RL5.6] Describe how a narrator’s or speaker’s point of view influences how events are described.
  • [RL5.9] Compare and contrast stories in the same genre (e.g., mysteries and adventure stories) on their approaches to similar themes and topics.

The standards below may be observed and assessed within any content area throughout the day:

  • [SL5.2] Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
  • [SL5.3] Summarize the points a speaker makes and explain how each claim is supported by reasons and evidence.
  • [SL5.4] Report on a topic or text, or present an opinion, sequencing ideas logically and using appropriate facts and relevant descriptive details to support main ideas or theme, speak clearly at an understandable pace.
  • [SL5.5] Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, sound) and visual displays in presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.
  • [SL5.6] Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, using formal English when appropriate to task and situation.
  • [L5.3a] Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. Expand, combine, and reduce sentences for meaning, reader/listener interest, and style.
  • [L5.5c] Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., synonyms, antonyms, homographs) to better understand each of the words.
  • [L5.6] Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate conversational, general academic, and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that signal contrast, addition, and other logical relationships (e.g., although, nevertheless, similarly, moreover, in addition).

Science

Ecosystems

[5.L.2] Understand the interdependence of plants and animals with their ecosystems.

  • [2.0321] Reads and comprehends grade appropriate nonfiction text
  • [2.01] Uses metacognitive strategies flexibly independently to monitor comprehension extend vocabulary (skim, scan, reread the text, consult other sources, ask for help, summarize, paraphrase, question)
  • Expands refines through knowledge of prefixes suffixes (e.g., com-, con-, en-, ex-, pre-, pro-, -ent, -ant, -able, -ible
    • [5.L.2.1] Compare the characteristics of several common ecosystems, including estuaries and salt marshes, oceans, lakes and ponds, forests, and grasslands.
    • [5.L.2.2] Classify the organisms within an ecosystem according to the function they serve: producers, consumers, or decomposers (biotic factors)
    • [5.L.2.3] Infer the effects that may result from the interconnected relationship of plants and animals to their ecosystem

[4.L.1] Understand the effects of environmental changes, adaptations and behaviors that enable animals (including humans) to survive in changing habitats.

  • [4.L.1.3] Explain how humans can adapt their behavior to live in changing habitats (e.g., recycling wastes, establishing rain gardens, planting trees and shrubs to prevent flooding and erosion.
  • [1.06] Explain and evaluate some ways that humans affect ecosystems: Habitat reduction due to development: Pollutants, Increased Nutrients
  • [1.07] Determine how materials are recycled in nature.

[5.L.1] Understand how structure and systems of organisms (to include the human body) perform functions necessary for life.

  • [5.L.1.1] Explain why some organisms are capable of surviving as a single cell while others require many cells that are specialized to survive.
  • [5.P.3] Explain how the properties of some materials change as a result of heating and cooling.
  • [5.P.3.1] Explain the effects of the transfer of heat (either by direct contact or at a distance) that occurs between objects at different temperatures (conduction, convection, radiation).

Science - Body Systems

[5.L.1]Understand how structures and systems of organisms (to include the human body) perform functions necessary for life.

  • [5.L.1.1] Explain why some organisms are capable of surviving as a single cell while others require many cells that are specialized to survive.
  • [5.L.1.2] Compare the major systems of the human body (digestive, respiratory, circulatory, muscular, skeletal, cardiovascular) as it relates to their functions necessary for life.

[5.L.3]Understand why organisms differ from or are similar to their parents based on the characteristics of the organism. 

  • [5.L.3.1 ] Explain why organisms differ from or are similar to their parents based on the characteristics of the organism.
  • 5.L.3.2] Give examples of likenesses that are inherited and some that are not.

 

Science  - Weather

[5.E.1] Understand weather patterns and phenomena, making connection to the weather in a particular place and time.

  • [5.E.1.1 ] Compare daily and seasonal changes in weather conditions (including wind speed and direction, precipitation, and temperature) and patterns.
  • [5.E.1.2] Predict upcoming weather events from weather data collected through observation and measurements.
  • [5.E.1.3] Explain how global patterns such as the jet stream and water currents influence local weather in measurable terms such as temperature, wind direction and speed, and precipitation.
  • [5.E.1.3 ] Explain how global patterns such as the jet stream and water currents influence local weather in measurable terms such as temperature, wind direction and speed, and precipitation.

[5.P.2] Understand the interactions of matter and energy and the changes that occur.

·  [2.0321] Reads and comprehends grade appropriate nonfiction text 2.01] Uses metacognitive strategies flexibly independently to monitor comprehension extend vocabulary (skim, scan, reread the text, consult other sources, ask for help, summarize, paraphrase, question) Expands refines through knowledge of prefixes suffixes (e.g., com-, con-, en-, ex-, pre-, pro-, -ent, -ant, -able, -ible

  • [5.P.2.1 ] Explain how the sun’s energy impacts the processes of the water cycle (including evaporation, transpiration, condensation, precipitation and run-off).

[5.P.3 ] Explain how the properties of some materials change as a result of heating and cooling.

  • [5.P.3.1 ] Explain the effects of the transfer of heat (either by direct contact or at a distance) that occurs between objects at different temperatures (conduction, convection, or radiation).
  • [5.P.3.2] Explain how heating and cooling affect some materials and how this relates to their purpose and practical applications.

·          

Science  - Motion and Design

[5.P.1]Understand force, motion and the relationship between them.

  • [5.P.1.1] Explain how factors such as gravity, friction, and change in mass affect the motion of objects.
  • [5.P.1.2] Infer the motion of objects in terms of how far they travel in a certain amount of time and the direction in which they travel.
  • [5.P.1.3 ] Illustrate the motion of an object using a graph to show a change in position over a period of time.
  • [5.P.1.4] Predict the effect of a given force or a change in mass on the motion of an object.

[5.P.2] Understand the interactions of matter and energy and the changes that occur. 

  • [5.P.2.2]Compare the weight of an object to the sum of the weight of its parts before and after an interaction.
  • [5.P.2.3] Summarize properties of original materials, and the new material (s) formed, to demonstrate that a change has occurred.

Social Studies

Social Studies Goal 1 - Economy

 5.E.1, 5.E.2

Understand how a market economy impacts life in the United States.

Understand that personal choices result in benefits or consequences.

 Apply key geographic concepts to the United States and other countries of North America

  • location of major landforms, bodies of water, and natural resources in the United States and other countries of North America
  • how absolute and relative location influence ways of living in the United States and other countries of North America
  • physical and cultural characteristics of regions within the United States, and other countries of North America
  • economic and social differences between developed and developing regions in North America
  • population distribution within and between countries of North America
  • how people of the United States and other countries of North America adapt to, modify, and use their physical environment
  • movement of people, goods, and ideas within and among the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Central America past and present

Social Studies Goal 2 - Revolutionary War

5.H.1&2,5.G.1,5.C&G.

5.H.1 Analyze the chronology of key events in the United States.

5.H.2 Understand the role of prominent figures in shaping the United States.

5.G.1 Understand how human activity has and continues to shape the United States.

5.C&G.1.3 Analyze historical documents that shaped the foundation of the United States government.

5.C.1 Understand how increased diversity resulted from migration, settlement patterns and economic development in the United States.

 Analyze political and social institutions in North America and examine how these institutions respond to human needs, structure society, and influence behavior

  • major documents that formed the foundations of the American idea of constitutional government.
  • local, state, and national levels of government in the United States and their legislative, executive, and judicial functions.
  • how the United States government has changed over time.
  • Similarities and differences in the governments of the United States, Canada, Mexico, and selected countries of Central America.
  • the role of political parties in society.
  • the role of public education in the United States.
  • movement of people, goods, and ideas within and among the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Central America past and present
  • the educational structure of the United States, Canada, Mexico, and selected countries of Central America.
  • the role the family plays in the societal structures of the United States, Canada, Mexico, and selected countries of Central America.

Social Studies Goal 3 - Government & Westward Expansion

5.G.1,5.C&G.1+,5.C.1

5.H.1 Analyze the chronology of key events in the United States.

5.G.1 Understand how human activity has and continues to shape the United States.

5.C&G.1 Understand the development, structure and function of government in the United States.

5.C&G.2 Analyze life in a democratic republic through rights and responsibilities of citizens.

5.C.1 Understand how increased diversity resulted from migration, settlement patterns and economic development in the United States.

 Examine the roles various ethnic groups have played in the development of the United States and its neighboring countries

  • people of diverse ethnic and religious cultures, past and present, in the United States
  • how changes in the movement of people, goods, and ideas have affected ways of living in the United States
  • cultural interaction within and among the regions of the United States
  • how the differences and similarities among people have produced diverse American cultures
  • religious and ethnic impact of settlement on different regions of the United States
  • roles various religious and ethnic groups have played in the development of the United States with those of Canada, Mexico, and selected countries of Central America
  • art, music, and craft forms in the United States, Canada, Mexico, and selected countries of Central America

Social Studies Goal 4 - Civil War & Reconstruction

H.1 Analyze the chronology of key events in the United States.

5.H.1.3 Analyze the impact of major conflicts, battles, and wars on the development of our nation through Reconstruction.

5.H.2 Understand the role of prominent figures in shaping the United States.

5.H.2.3 Compare the changing roles of women and minorities on American society from Pre-Colonial through Reconstruction.

5.G.1 Understand how human activity has and continues to shape the United States.

5.G.1.3 Exemplify how technological advances (communication, transportation and agriculture) have allowed people to overcome geographic limitations.

5.G.1.4 Exemplify migration within or immigration to the United States in order to identify push and pull factors.

5.C&G.2 Analyze life in a democratic republic through rights and responsibilities of citizens.

5.C&G.2.1 Understand the values and principles of a democratic republic.

5.C.1 Understand how increased diversity resulted from migration, settlement patterns and economic development in the United States.

5.C.1.4 Understand how cultural narratives (legends, songs, ballads, games, folk tales, and art forms) reflect the lifestyles, beliefs, and struggles of diverse ethnic groups.

 

Trace key developments in United States history and describe their impact on the land and people of the nation and its neighboring countries

  • the role of an historian and the importance of studying history
  • when, where, why, and how groups of people settled in different regions of the United States
  • contributions of people of diverse cultures throughout the history of the United States
  • causes and effects of the American Revolution, and their influence on the adoption of the Articles of Confederation, Constitution, and the Bill of Rights
  • impact of wars and conflicts on United States citizens, including but not limited to, the Civil War, World War I, World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, Persian Gulf War, and the twenty-first century war on terrorism
  • civil rights and social movements throughout United States' history that reflect the struggle for equality and constitutional rights for all citizens
  • changes in rural and urban settlement patterns in the United States, Canada, Mexico, and selected countries of Central America
  • development of the United States as a world leader and the impact of its relationships with Canada, Mexico, and selected countries of Central America

Writing

Writing Standards Quarter  1: Personal Narratives

·                     W5.3a - Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.  Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.

·                     W5.3 b - Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.

·                     W5.3c - Use a variety of transitional words, phrases, and clauses to manage the sequence of events.

·                     W5.3d - Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely.

·                     W5.3e - Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.

·                     W5.5 - With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.  (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1-3 up to and including grade 5 on pages 28 1nd 29.)

·                     L5.1 – Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. 

a.        Explain the function of conjunctions, prepositions, and interjections in general and their function in particular sentences.

c.        Use verb tense to convey various times, sequences, states, and conditions.

e.        Use correlative conjunctions (e.g., either/or, neither/nor).

·                     L5.2a - Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.  Use punctuation to separate items in a series.

·                     L5.4b - Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 5 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.  Use common, grade-appropriate Greek and Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., photograph, photosynthesis).

  • L5.5c - Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.  Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., synonyms, antonyms, homographs) to better understand each of the words.

Writing Standards Quarter  2: Personal Narratives

·                     [W5.1a] – Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.  Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an  opinion, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the author’s purpose.

·                     [W5.1b ]– Provide logically ordered reasons that are supported by facts and details.

·                     [W5.1c] – Link opinion and reasons using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., consequently, specifically).

·                     [W5.1d] – Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.

·                     [W5.4 ]- Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.  (Grade-specific  expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above)

·                     [W5.9a] – Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflections, and research.  Apply grade 5 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or a drama, drawing on specific details in the text [e.g., how characters interact]”).

·                     [W5.9b] – Apply grad 5 Reading standards to informational texts (e.g., “Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point[s]”).

·                     [W5.10] - Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflections, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

·                     [L5.2 ]- Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. 

a.        Use underlining, quotation marks, or italics to indicate titles of works.

b.        Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed.

Writing Standards Quarter  3: Fantasy & Interpre

tive Writing

·                     [W5.3a] - Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.  Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.

·                     [W5.3 b] - Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.

·                     [W5.3c] - Use a variety of transitional words, phrases, and clauses to manage the sequence of events.

·                     [W5.3d ]- Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely.

·                     [W5.3e ]- Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.

·                     W5.4] - Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.  (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above)

·                     [L5.1] - Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

a.        Form and use the perfect (e.g., I had walked; I have walked; I will have walked) verb tenses.

    d.      Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense.

·                     [L5.2] - Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. 

a.        Use a comma to separate an introductory element from the rest of the sentence.

b.        Use a comma to set off the words yes and no (e.g., Yes, thank you) to set off a tag question from the rest of the sentence (e.g., It’s true, isn’t it?),  and to indicate direct address (e.g., Is that you, Steve?).

·                     [L5.5b] – Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs.

·                     [W5.1a ]– Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.  Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the author’s purpose.

·                     [W5.1b] – Provide logically ordered reasons that are supported by facts and details.

·                     [W5.1c] – Link opinion and reasons using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., consequently, specifically).

·                     [W5.1d] – Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.

·                     [W5.4] - Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.  (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above)

·                     [L5.1] - Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

a.        Form and use the perfect (e.g., I had walked; I have walked; I will have walked) verb tenses.

c.        Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense.

·                     [L5.2] - Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

b      Use a comma to separate an introductory element from the rest of the sentence.   

e.     Use a comma to set off the words yes and no (e.g., Yes, thank you) to set off a tag question from the rest of the sentence (e.g., It’s true, isn’t it?), and to

        indicate direct address (e.g., Is that you, Steve?).

Writing Standards Quarter  4: Research Projects

  • [W5.2a] - Write informative/ explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.  Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and group related information logically; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  • [W5.2b] - Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.
  • [W5.2c] - Link ideas within and across categories of information using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., in contrast, especially).
  • [W5.2d] - Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
  • [W5.2e] - Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.
  • [W5.6] - With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of two pages in a single sitting.
  • [W5.7] – Conduct research projects that use several sources to build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.
  • [W5.8] – Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information in notes and finished work, and provide a list of sources.
  • [W5.9b] - Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflections, and research.  Apply grade 5 Reading standards to informational texts (e.g., “Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point[s]”).
  • [W5.10] - Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflections, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
  • [L5.2] - Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. 

a.        Use underlining, quotation marks, or italics to indicate titles of works.

e.     Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed.